A Rock Photographer’s Tribute to Jimi Hendrix
Oct29

A Rock Photographer’s Tribute to Jimi Hendrix

By Baron Wolman— In April 1967, my life changed unexpectedly, and for the better, when I met Jann Wenner—a then twenty-one-year-old freelance writer and student at the University of California, Berkeley. I had been photographing bands for a while in the Bay Area, when Wenner told me of his plans to start a new kind of music periodical. It would become Rolling Stone. He invited me to join him in his endeavor and I immediately agreed,...

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12,000 Free “Roadside America” Images
Oct02

12,000 Free “Roadside America” Images

         By Albert Chi — Tooling along in a spiffy, rented Cadillac, John Margolies, architectural critic, author and photographer would take off on months-long road trips throughout America along with his Canon FT, a 50mm lens and a trunkfull of ASA 25 Kodachrome film. It was the 1970s and the new interstate highways were about to bypass the venerable old ones where here and there and everywhere roadside signs and kitschy statues and...

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Keeping The Faith: Empty Sky Project
Sep16

Keeping The Faith: Empty Sky Project

By Steve Simon— Faith is an element of my photography that continues to surface in my work, not only in the stories I choose to pursue, but also in my philosophy and approach to shooting. What happened to me with my project Empty Sky: The Pilgrimage to Ground Zero was an exercise in faith and belief in my work, and a great example of what can happen when you put your work out there. The story dates back to just after 9/11. I decided...

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Miyako Koumura: Capturing Japan’s Flowers For Posterity
Aug15

Miyako Koumura: Capturing Japan’s Flowers For Posterity

By Arthur H. Bleich— It’s midnight in a small town west of Tokyo and almost everyone’s asleep except for Miyako Koumura who’s loading her photo equipment into an old, silver-gray Honda Fit (her economical and reliable companion, she calls it), preparing to set out for Chuzenji Lake in Nikko National Park, about a three-hour drive north. By the time she arrives the sky has begun to lighten and, after parking her car,...

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The Encaustic Photo Artistry of Jill Skupin Burkholder
Jun30

The Encaustic Photo Artistry of Jill Skupin Burkholder

By Arthur H. Bleich— On the last day of January, 2014, a small, brown package arrived at the home of Jill Skupin Burkholder, a photo/artist who lives in Palenville, NY, a tiny hamlet nestled at the base of the Catskill mountains. Inside the package rested a highly sophisticated HCO ScoutGuard trail camera, capable of capturing night photographs of wildlife and then transmitting them to a remote iPhone for instant viewing. The images...

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David Bergman: On the Road with Bon Jovi’s Band
Jun16

David Bergman: On the Road with Bon Jovi’s Band

by David Bergman— I’ve had the honor of traveling the world to cover music and sports events for over 25 years, and my most enjoyable gig is when I’m embedded on a tour with a band. I’ve done this with a number of groups so far, including Bon Jovi and Barenaked Ladies and I’m working with with country superstars like Luke Combs now. People frequently ask me what my typical day is like. I’m sure most working professional photographers...

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Seeing Differently
Apr29

Seeing Differently

By Michael Freeman— One of the first tenets of professional photography is that you have to try harder, always and all the time. There’s almost too much said about this, so I’ll restrict myself to one only, from American photographer William Albert Allard: “You’ve got to push yourself harder. You’ve got to start looking for pictures nobody else could take. You’ve got to take the tools you have and probe deeper.” Well, maybe I’ll allow...

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Lotte Jacobi’s America
Feb18

Lotte Jacobi’s America

By Arthur H. Bleich–   Gary Samson was an aspiring 25-year-old photographer in 1976 when he first met Lotte Jacobi in New Hampshire. She was 80 and a successful German portrait photographer from Berlin who had emigrated to New York City in 1935, narrowly escaping Adolf Hitler’s persecution of the Jews. Samson was working for the University of New Hampshire as a  filmmaker who had been assigned to do a documentary movie about her and...

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A Great Read: “Photographers On Photography”
Dec29

A Great Read: “Photographers On Photography”

By Henry Carroll– Let’s consider the visionaries, the groundbreakers, the original thinkers – those influential figures from past and present who pushed photography forward and continue to do so today. How did they – how do they – approach their craft and what matters most? Here we have a selection of quotations, photographs and interviews that offer telling insights into the minds of masters. Serving as brief introductions to the big...

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My 70-Year Love Affair With Photography
Oct28

My 70-Year Love Affair With Photography

  By Larry Silver– As a boy growing up in the East Bronx, I knew “the photographer” as the guy who took pictures at weddings and Bar Mitzvah’s. My Uncle Herman, the “authority” on all subjects, had never heard of Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alfred Stieglitz or Edward Weston. nor, for that matter, had anyone else in my building on Elder Avenue. Yet somehow at the age of 14 I became fascinated by the idea of making pictures and...

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Our National Parks Odyssey: Into The Winds
Sep20

Our National Parks Odyssey: Into The Winds

This is the fifth of an ongoing series about Red River Pro Andrew Slaton and his wife Ellen who, along with two dogs, Islay and Skye and Colonel Bubba, the cat, left the comforts of Dallas to hit the road full time in a travel trailer, with the goal of photographing all 59 U. S. National Parks. This is a continuation of Part 4 which ran in the previous post.— By Andrew Slaton– We meandered down the Gulf Coast chasing blue water and...

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Our National Parks Odyssey: One Wild Life
Aug30

Our National Parks Odyssey: One Wild Life

This is the fourth of an ongoing series about Red River Pro Andrew Slaton and his wife Ellen who, along with two dogs, Islay and Skye and Colonel Bubba, the cat, left the comforts of Dallas to hit the road full time in a travel trailer, with the goal of photographing all 59 U. S. National Parks. By Andrew Slaton– There’s an ebb and flow on Soda Lake that sounds remarkably like the ocean. I hear the whoosh…. whoosh…. whoosh outside our...

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“Into The Light” Showcases Legendary Musical Artists
Aug13

“Into The Light” Showcases Legendary Musical Artists

By Jérôme Brunet– My love for music began long before I found my way into photography. My mother was a classically trained musician and teacher, and had me playing the cello at age four. I continued on for the next ten years into my teens, but when I first heard the opening riff of Led Zeppelin’s “Communication Breakdown” I instantly switched over to the guitar. It wasn’t until high school, when I took a photography class, that my...

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What Rembrandt Taught Me About Portrait Lighting
Jul30

What Rembrandt Taught Me About Portrait Lighting

By Joel Grimes– Part of the requirements for receiving a BFA in Photography from the University of Arizona included half a dozen semesters of art history.At the time I felt like this was overkill and was only interested in attending my photo-related classes. In hindsight, one of the greatest influences that shaped my personal vision as a photographer did not come from studying the work of the master photographers, but that of a master...

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Jack Delano’s Greatest Photo Assignment
May21

Jack Delano’s Greatest Photo Assignment

by Arthur H. Bleich– Jack Delano’s fascination with trains began when he was eight, but it wasn’t until he was nearly 30 that he got a photographer’s dream assignment: Document the nation’s railroads in time of war. The year was 1942. Delano (pronounced de-LAY-no) was born Jacob Ovcharov on August 1, 1914 in the small village of Voroshilovka in the Ukraine. His teacher father and dentist mother exposed him to music and art at an early...

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Expressive Nature Photography
Apr15

Expressive Nature Photography

by Brenda Tharp– Photography is pure joy. The ability to see something special and capture it in the camera is nothing short of amazing for me, even after all the years I’ve been a photographer. From the tiniest detail of a flower to the grand expanse of the Milky Way stretching overhead at night, our world is an outstanding place, providing countless opportunities to experience beauty. To be out photographing in nature is truly the...

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The Exquisite Eye of Kiyoshi Togashi
Mar28

The Exquisite Eye of Kiyoshi Togashi

                By Arthur H. Bleich– Kiyoshi Togashi knew by the time he was ten that as the second son of the largest landholder in the Yamagata Prefecture of Japan, he was not going to inherit the family farm. By tradition, it would go to his older brother. Far from being disappointed, this impetuous and driven youth felt a sense of exhilaration and freedom because he’d be able to follow whatever path in life he desired. During his...

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New York In The Snow
Feb14

New York In The Snow

by Vivienne Gucwa– I wish I could say that there was one photo that started it all. It would be the one photo that somehow ignited my passion for snow photography in New York City. The one that people could look at to understand why I might walk up to eight miles through snowstorms at night. But there isn’t. That’s because my passion for New York in the snow began at a very early age. I grew up in a financially challenged household in...

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Kaitlin Walsh– Merging Art With Anatomy
Jan24

Kaitlin Walsh– Merging Art With Anatomy

by Arthur H. Bleich– Kaitlin Walsh is a biomedical artist– a rarity in the art world. Her beautifully crafted, abstract anatomy watercolor paintings celebrate the wonders of the human body in ways so imaginative it’s sometimes hard not to fall in love with her deadly cancer cells or even mundane parts of the human body, like an ankle, so beautifully are they executed. These are not those sterile pictures you see hung on the walls in...

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Our National Parks Odyssey: The Real Reward
Nov29

Our National Parks Odyssey: The Real Reward

This is the third of an ongoing series about Red River Pro Andrew Slaton and his wife Ellen who, along with two dogs, Islay and Skye and Colonel Bubba, the cat, left the comforts of Dallas to hit the road full time in a travel trailer, with the goal of photographing all 59 U. S. National Parks. So far, they’ve visited 23– just 36 to go! –By Andrew Slaton– The Southwest… From Big Bend on the Texas/ Mexico border, we worked...

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