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Frank Hamrick– Handcrafted Photobooks

By Arthur H. Bleich– When Frank Hamrick was ten he traded his sister an old hat for a plastic 35mm camera she’d gotten from a kid on the school bus who’d gotten it from his father who’d gotten it from an auto dealer as a premium for test driving a car. And so began an illustrious arts career for this now-40-year-old “superstar of southern art,” an accolade bestowed by the prestigious Oxford American Magazine. His work mixes...

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For Love Of Lions

By Kenn Jacobs– My first published photo in a book was a pub sign–The Old Red Lion–shot in a now-forgotten English village. It wasn’t until many years later, though, that I had an epiphany when I came face to face with the sculpture of the Lion of Lucerne in Switzerland. Carved in 1820 as a memorial to the bravery of 600 Swiss Guards who lost their lives in 1792 during the French Revolution, Mark Twain described it as “the most...

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It Takes Guts To Use This Camera

By Arthur H. Bleich– In the 1966 movie Fantastic Voyage, a team of scientists and their submarine are reduced to microscopic size and inserted into the bloodstream of a colleague to remove a blood clot in his brain; a procedure too risky to do surgically. Science fiction? Of course­– but a thriller all the same. By 2001, scientists have shrunk a digital camera, lights and a radio transmitter to fit into a vitamin-pill-sized capsule that can...

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The Appeal of Black & White Photography

By Michael Freeman– There is now a significant and growing reverse flow in photography, towards the new black and white. It’s new because it’s created from colour with processing software that makes the experience a delight, which means that you don’t even need to decide at the start that it’s a black-and-white image you’re after. You can even trawl your archives with a reconsiderate eye and look for images that might work more...

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The Romantic Spirit Of Photography

By Suzanne D. Williams– Lately, I find myself pulled into two halves. The logical side of me writes photography articles, historical facts, and how-tos. This is my dominant side. However, there is also my creative side. This side surrounds itself with fictional characters, romantic verses, and colorful images. This side learned how to say “I love you” in Irish Gaelic (there are about a half dozen ways) and swooned at the beauty of...

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Make Big Images With Small Desktop Printers

By Christine Pentecost– I have a beautiful, scenic image in my collection that begged to be displayed larger than could be output by my desktop printer– which only can use letter-sized paper. Surely, I thought, there must be some way to solve this problem and, as it turns out, there is. Image Splitter is a very simple-to-use (and free) software program that takes an image and quickly divides it into sections which can then be sized to your...

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Exhibit Your Photos for Prestige and Profit

       By Peter E. Randall– For most photographers, the chance to have a one-person exhibit is an exciting opportunity. Then reality sets in and it’s apparent that having an exhibit is more stressful and difficult than making the photographs in the first place. The most ideal opportunity is to be invited to show by a major gallery or a museum, but for most of us that’s not an option. We don’t have the reputation or the following...

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Digital Photography– Where Next?

By Chris Gatcum– You only have to look at what’s happened to photography in the 21st Century to see how rapidly the technology that underpins it is moving: in the year 2000, full-frame cameras were a mere suggestion; a digital SLR costing less than $1,000 was a dream; and CSCs [Compact System Cameras], sophisticated camera phones, and high-resolution digital video were simply unimaginable. Yet today all of these things—and more—are...

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Spectrum Expands For Color Blind Photographers!

by Arthur H. Bleich– If your prints look good to you but not to anyone else, you could be color blind. More than 14 million people in the U.S. and Canada are afflicted with some type of color vision deficiency ranging from mild to severe which makes it impossible for them to see colors that normal-sighted people see– and to tell different colors apart from one another. With almost 60 million people seriously involved in photography,...

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Our National Parks Odyssey

By Andrew Slaton– Steam from the early morning chill rises off the Green River in the Wind River Range of Wyoming.  Squaretop, an aptly named handsome granite mountain in the distance catches the first rays of the sun, rising somewhere I cannot yet see. I sip my scalding, black coffee in our trailer and wait. This is what I do. I get paid to just sit out in some of the wildest places of the world until that unreal moment of light, weather,...

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