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Documenting Maine’s Penobscot River Wilderness. Part 2

By Zac Durant— The first half of my trip was leisurely paced down the West Branch of the Penobscot and I had time to enjoy and photograph much of the river’s wildlife including an industrious beaver who simply ignored me, an inquisitive moose, and low flying eagles that soared by. And then there was the peculiar jack rabbit who paddled out in the shallows and hopped onto a protruding rock. As I approached, he seemed unconcerned by my...

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Documenting Maine’s Penobscot River Wilderness. Part 1

By Zac Durant— The fierce intensity of the wind had carried my canoe out to the middle of the huge lake, where white caps were threatening to capsize it. If it were to succumb to the turbulent waters, I would not be in a very favorable situation. The water was cold, and I was at least a half-mile from shore. While I’m a capable swimmer, I didn’t like those odds very much… It all began in August, 2020 after I’d done a...

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46 Photogs + 3 Years = 10,000 Images of NH

By Peter E. Randall— How many photographers does it take to document life in New Hampshire? According to the New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists (NHSPA), the number is forty-six. At least that is how many professionals and advanced amateurs participated in a unique three-year shoot which will result in a full color hardbound book and exhibits in eight New Hampshire institutions. The book, New Hampshire Now, A Photographic Diary of...

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Favorite Photo Places: Carlsbad Caverns, NM

By Lon Shelton & Ron Wolfe— Beneath the prickly pear and cholla cactus of the Chihuahuan desert in southeast New Mexico lies a spectacular treasure. Carlsbad Caverns National Park – a complex of 117 caves including the largest accessible cave chamber on our continent– dazzles visitors with its magnificence, its cathedral-like silence, and the sheer scope of its reach. On a normal year, roughly half a million visitors come to see this...

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Nikola Olic: Dominates Tall Buildings With A Single Lens!

By Albert Chi— Nikola Olic is a lover of photography– a quintessential “amateur” in the classical sense of the word. He’s free to exercise his artistic vision any way he chooses without restraints of time or client demands. “I was born and raised in Belgrade, Serbia,” says Olic, now 47, “and came to the U.S. at 17 as an exchange student to study computer science and engineering.” He was assigned to the University of Texas,...

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Baron Wolman, Iconic Rock Photographer, Dies at 83

By Tony Bonanno— Baron Wolman died peacefully on November 2, 2020 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He was 83. I feel privileged to have been able to call him a good friend for almost two decades. Baron was Rolling Stone magazine’s first photographer and actually had a major role in getting the unique rock music magazine of the Hippie generation off the ground. Although his iconic images are well known, and many of you who are reading this have...

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How Photography Helped Save My Life

By Michael Blanchard— I was arrested in February 2010 in Maine for drunk driving while attempting to drive to Boston to talk to my wife and try to repair the damage from our constant fights. I was the COO at a company in Maine and my wife was living in the city. She was my whole world, and I was losing her. With no other support system I fell apart, with only vodka to hold me together. When I was arrested a second time, in March, for speeding,...

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Get Your Creative Mojo Back… It’s In The Cards!

By Christine Pentecost— I don’t think I have to explain why I’ve had a hard time feeling creative over the past 11 months. As a photographer, I would usually carry the camera with me in my car wherever I went. Once things started closing down and when, one by one, all my art shows got cancelled, my cameras started collecting dust. I lost all inspiration to photograph anything. With the start of the new year, I knew I needed to get out of...

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Paul Chaplo: Flyin’ High Over The Texas Plains

By Arthur H. Bleich— Paul Chaplo, 62, is a “a photographers photographer.” His technique is flawless and his clients, mostly commercial biggies in and around Texas, not only love his work, but love working with him. He  holds  a Master of Fine Arts Photography degree from Rochester Institute of Technology and leaves nothing to chance, which is why his work shines in annual reports, books and other venues. On assignment to shoot more than...

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Spending the 1958 Winter Solstice in Barrow, Alaska

By Arthur H. Bleich— The Wien Alaska Airlines war-surplus C-47 made a large circle in the dark, noonday sky. All I could see out the window as it began its final approach was the bright moon shining on a small cluster of lighted buildings surrounded by a vast expanse of ice. I lifted my camera to the window, set the focus to infinity and shot a picture at about 1/15th of a second at F-3.5, expecting nothing but a blurred image. Then we were on...

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